Final evaluation of Linnaeus grants

During 2019–2020, the Swedish Research Council carries out a final evaluation of the Linnaeus grant. Did the Linnaeus grants produce the desired effect? What have they meant for Swedish research?

The final evaluation of the Linnaeus grants will focus on the over-arching changes the funding was intended to achieve. These included changes to the system for research funding, and to the capacity of higher education institutions (HEIs) to develop and maintain strong research environments.

In autumn 2018, we started our collection of data ahead of the final evaluation. Some of the data collection will be done in two stages – one for each call. For the 2005 call, the programme period 2006–2016 apply, for the 2007 call, the programme period 2008–2018 apply.

Timetable and deadlines for planned data collection autumn 2019

Activity

Deadline for data collection activity

Programme period

Survey to researchers affiliated to the Linnaeus centres

20 September 2019

2008–2018

Survey to external advisors of the Linnaeus centres

20 September 2019

2008–2018

Financial and personnel reporting

10 September 2019

2008–2018

Case study for societal impact

10 September 2019

2008–2018

Case study for scientific impact

10 September 2019

2008–2018

Instructions and templates for each activity are beeing sent out by email to those who have been appointed as contact persons at the higher education institutions that have received Linnaeus grants

 

The overall evaluation will be conducted by an independent international scientific expert panel performing a peer review. The evaluation will be carried out in two steps by the panel. The first step consists of performing a pre-evaluation, and the second step of a hearing with personnel from the HEIs involved and the Linnaeus centres.

Composition of the panel:

  • Jurgen Mlynek Humbolt, Universität Berlin, Germany (Chair, NT)
  • Marja Makarow, Biocenter Finland, Helsingfors, Finland (Chair, M)
  • Karl Ulrich Mayer, Max Planck Berlin, Germany (HS)
  • Sarah Harper, University of Oxford, UK (HS)
  • Jane Falkingham, University of Southampton, UK (HS)
  • Christine Maggs, University of Bournemouth, UK (N)
  • Hannu Koskinen, University of Helsinki, Finland (N)
  • Patrizia d'Ettore, Sorbonne Univeristy, Paris, France (N)
  • Bart de Moor, KU Leuven, Belgien (T)
  • Antonio Bicchi, University of Pisa, Italy (T)
  • Eleanor E.B., Campbell University of Edinburgh, UK (T)
  • Taina Pihlajaniemi, University of Oulu, Finland (M)
  • Richard G M Morris, University of Edinburgh, UK (M)
  • Christof von Kalle, National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT) Heidelberg and German Cancer Research Center, Germany (M)

A strategic investment in strong research environments

The main purposes of the Linnaeus grants have been to create, reinforce, maintain and uphold internationally leading research environments, and to strengthen the ability of higher education institutions to make strategic prioritisations and to profile their research. The investment was also expected to result in structural effects on the research system, for example in the form of a mustering of strength and collaboration, and through effects on societal wellbeing and growth.

The Linnaeus grants were presented as a new grant format in the Swedish Government’s research policy bill, Research for a Better Life (Govt. Bill 2004/05:80).

PublISHED ON 02 July 2018

UpDATED ON 09 September 2019

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