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News

PublISHED ON 02 December 2020

UpDATED ON 02 December 2020

“Reverse the death sentence against Ahmadreza Djalali"

I want to express my and the Swedish Research Council’s strong wish for the death sentence against Ahmadreza Djalali to be reversed, and for him to be reunited with his family in Sweden as soon as possible, says Sven Stafström, Director General of the Swedish Research Council.

Ahmadreza Djalali, the Swedish-Iranian researcher in disaster medicine, was arrested in April 2016 during a visit to his second home country, and has since then been imprisoned in Iran. The death sentence against him, and the treatment he has been subjected to in prison, are grave abuses of fundamental human rights, democratic principles, and academic freedom. Strong protests are being heard across the world from researchers and representatives of academia, from politicians, governments and organisations.

I want to express my and the Swedish Research Council’s strong wish for the death sentence against Ahmadreza Djalali to be reversed, and for him to be reunited with his family in Sweden as soon as possible.

Sven Stafström, Director General, Swedish Research Council

PUBLISHED ON 02 December 2020

UpDATED ON 02 December 2020

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